Bioprinting

Driving forward the world of 3D cell culture

CUSTOMER CASE
Minimizing the risk of transpant rejection
On-demand Bioprinted Patient-specific Heart Tissue

“We are using the patient’s own stem cells so that there’s no risk of rejection.”

 

Dr. Carmine Gentile

What is bioprinting?

Creating the future of health requires out of the box thinking and cutting edge solutions. The bioprinting business area is comprised of companies that are driving forward the world of 3D cell culture by listening intently to their customers and developing forward thinking solutions.

Central to these companies is bioprinting, a method of biofabrication which results in the automated and precise development of desired 3D cell culture.

Application areas

Replacing, engineering or regenerating human or animal cells, tissues or organs to restore or establish normal function.

Precise geometrical arrangement of multicellular constructs to better recapitulate in vivo human physiology and facilitate the production of more relevant in vitro tissue and disease models.

Combining cells, engineering, materials methods, and suitable biochemical and physicochemical factors to restore, maintain, improve, or replace different types of biological tissues to restore, maintain, improve, or replace different types of biological tissues.

Enabling the shift to 3D cell culture with physiologically relevant models and accurate downstream analysis methods.

Customer spotlights

Minimizing the risk of transpant rejection
On-demand Bioprinted Patient-specific Heart Tissue
Dr. Carmine Gentile’s lab in Sydney is developing bioprinted heart tissue on demand with patient-specific cells to minimize the risk of transplant rejection.

There is currently no way to repair damaged heart muscles from heart attacks, so many patients around the world wait on long heart transplant lists. Even for the lucky few who find a matching donor, there are more hurdles (i.e., organ viability, geographical distance, immune rejection). Therefore, heart disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. According to the World Health Organization, 17.9 million lives are lost each year to cardiovascular diseases.

Dr. Carmine Gentile, leader of the Cardiovascular Regeneration Group at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), announced in 2020 that his lab had “developed a technology that can 3D model and bioprint personalized hearts for transplantation, using the patient’s own stem cells so that there’s no risk of rejection.” Specifically, the technology identified the optimal conditions for cells to create blood vessels within bioprinted heart patches.

There is currently no way to repair damaged heart muscles from heart attacks, so many patients around the world wait on long heart transplant lists. Even for the lucky few who find a matching donor, there are more hurdles (i.e., organ viability, geographical distance, immune rejection). Therefore, heart disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. According to the World Health Organization, 17.9 million lives are lost each year to cardiovascular diseases.

Dr. Carmine Gentile, leader of the Cardiovascular Regeneration Group at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), announced in 2020 that his lab had “developed a technology that can 3D model and bioprint personalized hearts for transplantation, using the patient’s own stem cells so that there’s no risk of rejection.” Specifically, the technology identified the optimal conditions for cells to create blood vessels within bioprinted heart patches.

Read more on cellink.com →

“We are using the patient’s own stem cells so that there’s no risk of rejection.”

 

Dr. Carmine Gentile

Mass produced stem cells:
A gateway to personalized medicine​

Ronawk T-blocks are disrupting the industry by enabling the production of adult stem cells in large quantities.

The study of adult stem cells has increased exponentially because of recent technological innovations in the life sciences, especially within the field of bioprinting. The array of applications under consideration runs the gamut—from reversing baldness to managing diabetes to transplanting personalized bioprinted organoids.

With the latter, researchers are envisioning culturing a patient’s own adult stem cells to create viable organoids that could be transplanted into the patient with no need for the long-term immunosuppressant drugs they would have taken with a donated organ.

The study of adult stem cells has increased exponentially because of recent technological innovations in the life sciences, especially within the field of bioprinting. The array of applications under consideration runs the gamut—from reversing baldness to managing diabetes to transplanting personalized bioprinted organoids.

With the latter, researchers are envisioning culturing a patient’s own adult stem cells to create viable organoids that could be transplanted into the patient with no need for the long-term immunosuppressant drugs they would have taken with a donated organ.

Read more on cellink.com →

“The tissue block, or T-block, is a 3D scaffold that is expandable and modular to grow stem cells. The goal is to efficiently expand a patient’s own stem cells to engineer organoids or grafts that could be used in life-saving surgeries.”

 

A.J. Mellott, PhD

Breaking barriers​
Printing vascularized skin
Today’s synthetic skin graft products accelerate wound healing but eventually fall off because they never integrate with the patient’s skin tissue. The absence of a functioning vascular system in the synthetic grafts is a significant barrier.

Karande and his team have developed a bioink made up of human endothelial cells, human pericyte cells and animal collagen. They used the CELLINK BIO X and Temperature Controlled Printhead to ensure that these constructs could be printed.

This combination of key elements enabled the cells to start communicating and more importantly begin forming a biologically relevant vascular structure within the span of a few weeks. Once blood vessels formed, nutrients and waste could be exchanged to keep the graft alive. The groups significant development highlights the vast potential of 3D bioprinting in precision medicine, where solutions can be tailored to specific situations.

Karande and his team have developed a bioink made up of human endothelial cells, human pericyte cells and animal collagen. They used the CELLINK BIO X and Temperature Controlled Printhead to ensure that these constructs could be printed.

This combination of key elements enabled the cells to start communicating and more importantly begin forming a biologically relevant vascular structure within the span of a few weeks. Once blood vessels formed, nutrients and waste could be exchanged to keep the graft alive. The groups significant development highlights the vast potential of 3D bioprinting in precision medicine, where solutions can be tailored to specific situations.

Read more on cellink.com →

“…we could potentially even think of using this as a therapy for burn victims.”

 

Pankaj Karande
Associate Professor

Bioprinting Companies

By releasing the first universal bioink in 2016, CELLINK democratized the cost of entry for researchers around the world and played a major role in turning the then up-and-coming field of 3D bioprinting into the thriving $1 billion industry it is today. CELLINKs bioinks, bioprinters, software and services have enabled critical breakthroughs in a wide range of applications from 3D cell culturing to tissue engineering to drug development. 

Founded in 2016 by entrepreneurs out of Rutgers University, Visikol is a contract research services company focusing on accelerating the discovery and development of therapeutics by providing pharmaceutical and biotech companies with best-in-class 3D cell culture, 3D tissue imaging, multiplex imaging, and digital pathology services. Today, Visikol counts half of the top twenty pharmaceutical companies as customers.

The world leader of reliable in vitro human tissue model innovation. MatTeks skin, ocular, oral, respiratory, and intestinal tissue models are used to assess safety and efficacy throughout the cosmetics, chemical, pharmaceutical, and household product industries. These advanced tissue models empower companies to achieve their goals of non-animal testing while lowering testing costs and providing human-relevant results.

San Diego based Advanced BioMatrix is a leader in the life science industry of three dimensional (3D) applications for tissue culture, cell assay, bioprinting and cell proliferation. The products are recognized as the standard for purity, functionality and consistency.

With over 2,500 users, Nanoscribe develops and produces 3D printers and maskless lithography systems for microfabrication as well as specially developed printing materials and application-specific solution sets. The specialist for additive manufacturing of high-precision structures and objects on the nano-, micro- and mesoscale was founded in 2007 as a spin-off of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).